Resources and free recipes

A Selection Of Free Recipes From Better Brain Food, Plus A Selection Of Other Resources


Booklet: Nutrition For Seniors: A Guide To Healthy Eating Habits As You Age

I recently wrote a nutrition booklet for  Home Instead Senior Care, a home care organisation for seniors. You can access this booklet for free, by clicking on the button below.

A guide to healthy eating habits as you age

A guide to healthy eating habits as you age

 

Recipe: Roasted Carrot and Tahini Dip 

Roasted carrot and tahini dip_sml.jpg

The lemoniness of this dip depends on the lemons you happen to find, as some have a stronger flavour than others, but it adds a great flavour balance to this dip, which is packed with antioxidants from the carrots, the anti-inflammatory benefits of extra virgin olive oil and some protein from the yoghurt and tahini.

Makes 1½ cups

  • 500 g (1 lb 2 oz) baby Dutch carrots, coloured ones if you can find them

  • 60 ml (2 fl oz/¼ cup) olive oil, plus extra for roasting

  • 70 g (2½ oz/¼ cup) Greek-style yoghurt

  • 65 g (2½ oz/¼ cup) tahini

  • 1 teaspoon ground cumin

  • Juice and zest of 1 lemon

  • Crackers, to serve

Preheat the oven to 180°C (350°F). 

Scrub and trim the carrots and if they’re thick, slice them in half lengthways, then spread them out on a baking tray, drizzle with a little extra olive oil and season with salt.

Roast in the oven until soft and starting to turn dark golden on the edges. Set aside to cool.

Put the cooled carrots into the bowl of a food processor and pulse until finely chopped. Add the yoghurt, tahini, cumin and lemon juice and zest and pulse again until combined. With the motor running, drizzle the olive oil into the carrots and process for 30–40 seconds or until the dip comes together and looks creamy and smooth. 

Season to taste and serve with crackers.

This recipe appears in Better Brain Food, Pg 199


RECIPE: Rocket and Farro Greek Salad

First cultivated 2000 years ago, pearled farro (spelt) is an ancient grain related to wheat, that is also called emmer wheat in some places. Even though pearled farro has had the bran layer mostly removed, it’s still quite high in fibre and remains a good source of protein, some B vitamins and the mineral zinc. More importantly, it has a delicious nutty flavour with chewy texture. You can also buy wholegrain farro which is higher in fibre, but it needs soaking overnight before cooking.  If you can’t find farro, you can replace it with pearl (or pearled) barley, which has the same amount of protein, close to the same amount of fibre and is usually quite easy to find. Look in the homebrew section of your supermarket, if it’s not in the pasta and rice area, as it’s also used for that popular pursuit. (pg 114, Better Brain Food)      Serves 1   125g pearled farro (spelt)  1 Lebanese (short) cucumber, chopped  100 g (3½ oz) baby rocket (arugula)  1 spring onion (scallion), sliced  ½ cup cooked chickpeas (see page 78)  40 g (1½ oz/¼ cup) kalamata olives  100 g (3½ oz) cherry tomatoes, quartered  ½ bunch of flat-leaf (Italian) parsley, roughly chopped  100 g (3½ oz) feta cheese, crumbled     dressing   3 tablespoons lemon juice  80 ml (2½ fl oz/⅓ cup) olive oil  1 teaspoon dried oregano  2 teaspoons honey    To make the dressing, combine all of the ingredients in  a small bowl, season with salt and pepper and whisk to  combine. Set aside.  Rinse the farro and put it in a medium saucepan, then add 625 ml (211⁄2 fl oz/21⁄2 cups) of salted water. Bring to a rolling boil, then reduce the heat and simmer, covered, stirring occasionally for 15–20 minutes or until the farro is tender,  but still has a little bite left.  Drain the farro, drizzle with a little of the dressing and set aside.  In a medium serving bowl, combine the cucumber, rocket, spring onion, chickpeas, olives, tomatoes and parsley. Add the farro and pour the remaining dressing over.  Scatter the feta over the top and serve.     Cook chickpeas (garbanzo beans)   To prepare chickpeas, put 200 g (7 oz/1 cup) of dried chickpeas in a large bowl, big enough to allow room for the peas to expand. Cover with water and soak for 24 hours, changing the water at least once. Drain and rinse the chickpeas, transfer to a saucepan and cover with fresh water or stock to a depth of 4 cm (1¾ inches). Add aromatics such as rosemary, garlic or ginger; a piece of seaweed such as kombu or wakame will add extra flavour and nutrients. Simmer the chickpeas for 20–40 minutes until tender (the time really depends on the age of the chickpeas). Store the cooked chickpeas in their cooking water for up to 3 days in an airtight container in the fridge.

First cultivated 2000 years ago, pearled farro (spelt) is an ancient grain related to wheat, that is also called emmer wheat in some places. Even though pearled farro has had the bran layer mostly removed, it’s still quite high in fibre and remains a good source of protein, some B vitamins and the mineral zinc. More importantly, it has a delicious nutty flavour with chewy texture. You can also buy wholegrain farro which is higher in fibre, but it needs soaking overnight before cooking.

If you can’t find farro, you can replace it with pearl (or pearled) barley, which has the same amount of protein, close to the same amount of fibre and is usually quite easy to find. Look in the homebrew section of your supermarket, if it’s not in the pasta and rice area, as it’s also used for that popular pursuit. (pg 114, Better Brain Food)

Serves 1

125g pearled farro (spelt)

1 Lebanese (short) cucumber, chopped

100 g (3½ oz) baby rocket (arugula)

1 spring onion (scallion), sliced

½ cup cooked chickpeas (see page 78)

40 g (1½ oz/¼ cup) kalamata olives

100 g (3½ oz) cherry tomatoes, quartered

½ bunch of flat-leaf (Italian) parsley, roughly chopped

100 g (3½ oz) feta cheese, crumbled

dressing

3 tablespoons lemon juice

80 ml (2½ fl oz/⅓ cup) olive oil

1 teaspoon dried oregano

2 teaspoons honey

To make the dressing, combine all of the ingredients in
a small bowl, season with salt and pepper and whisk to
combine. Set aside.

Rinse the farro and put it in a medium saucepan, then add 625 ml (211⁄2 fl oz/21⁄2 cups) of salted water. Bring to a rolling boil, then reduce the heat and simmer, covered, stirring occasionally for 15–20 minutes or until the farro is tender,
but still has a little bite left.

Drain the farro, drizzle with a little of the dressing and set aside.

In a medium serving bowl, combine the cucumber, rocket, spring onion, chickpeas, olives, tomatoes and parsley. Add the farro and pour the remaining dressing over.

Scatter the feta over the top and serve.

Cook chickpeas (garbanzo beans)

To prepare chickpeas, put 200 g (7 oz/1 cup) of dried chickpeas in a large bowl, big enough to allow room for the peas to expand. Cover with water and soak for 24 hours, changing the water at least once. Drain and rinse the chickpeas, transfer to a saucepan and cover with fresh water or stock to a depth of 4 cm (1¾ inches). Add aromatics such as rosemary, garlic or ginger; a piece of seaweed such as kombu or wakame will add extra flavour and nutrients. Simmer the chickpeas for 20–40 minutes until tender (the time really depends on the age of the chickpeas). Store the cooked chickpeas in their cooking water for up to 3 days in an airtight container in the fridge.