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Better Brain Food

Eat to cheat dementia and cognitive decline

I’ve been asked many times to provide recipe ideas for people who have read my first books, and I’m thrilled to say that book now exists: Better Brain Food is published by Murdoch Books (Allen and Unwin) and offers a discussion of the science of nutrition and cognitive health along with 70+ beautiful recipes based on that.

No one can claim to have all the answers to preventing dementia or cognitive decline and neither does this book suggest these recipes guarantee that. But what you do get is a discussion, in everyday language, of the things – including foods -  research has shown so far can help reduce the risk of dementia along with enticing and achievable recipes based on that.

We know that the majority of older people do not develop dementia and there are many things we believe assist in maintaining robust cognition – physical as well as mental activity and staying socially connected are particularly important, and eating to support the body and brain in ageing and to promote peak brain function is no less valuable.

Better Brain Food is not only for older adults as my previous books have been; it offers advice to adults from 40 onwards – highlighting the particular things to eat and do in each decade beyond there to boost brain health.

In the science section I offer insight on the importance of the gut-brain axis, outline the pros and cons of the latest ‘superfood’ and diet trends claiming benefit, guide readers on how a healthy weight looks at different ages and much more.

The delicious recipes range from snacks and light meals, to more substantial offerings and even desserts, and include a section of recipes suitable to make for just one or two people. And naturally they are all based on the nutrition advice given in the book.

Enjoy!


Better Brain Food review

Dr Jane Tolman, Clinical Associate Professor
Wicking Dementia Research and Education Centre

"We are very lucky. This book is important for every older person, but also for each and every one of us as we relentlessly progress toward old age. 

We are what we eat. If we are to age well, we need to set down the framework now. Diet is simply critical to being healthy, to functioning well, and to dealing with the physical and mental stresses of our lives.

For those in old age already and for those caring for them, there will be many new insights, and the reintroduction of some concepts we have forgotten or neglected.

This book should be part of the library of every health professional, every person caring for an older friend or relative, and for every older person.  We should read it, share it and put it into practice.  I congratulate Ngaire on an important achievement."